Bring Alex Home for Christmas!

From Ideas & Action, Via Anarchist News:

On November 14th, Alejandro Torres was arrested along with five others in Pasadena at a Zapatista solidarity action outside of a speech by Vicente Fox, the ex-president of Mexico. Now more than a month after his arrest he is still in jail. Ever since being hauled away by the police with his comrades that night, Alex has been caged in jail for the single crime of being far too poor to afford the extravagant $100,000 bail that the judge has set for him. Help us bail Alex out of jail so that he can spend Christmas with his family and join us on the outside so that we can fight this case of political repression together! We’ve managed to arrange an agreement with a bail bondsman to bail Alex out for $3,000 instead of the unreachable $10,000 that would normally be required. We think that we can get scrape together the money for this if enough comrades are generous and pitch in.

Please donate here: https://www.wepay.com/donations/979829063
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FBI Witch Hunt: Interview with Chicano Organizer Carlos Montes

by Tim Loc, Staff,June 16, 2011

Activist Carlos Montes, a familiar face in the 1960s Chicano Movement, moved to Alhambra 20 years ago because he saw it as a peaceful enclave that was close to his homebase of East Los Angeles. He had a rude awakening on May 17 when the FBI and deputies from the Los Angeles Sheriff’s department executed a search warrant on his home. He was arrested after the search turned up a firearm. Montes speaks to The Alhambra Source on his history with activism, and what he alleges is the FBI’s agenda of targeting activists like him.

You were a co-founder of the Brown Berets. How did it begin?

It started as a civic youth group. It became the Young Chicanos for Community Action, and then it got more involved in direct grassroots organizing. Then it became the Brown Berets, and we dealt with the issues of education and police brutality. It started small, but once it took on a broader view of the political situation it grew really fast. It became part of the movement of the 60s. I grew up in East LA, so I saw the police mistreating the youth. We’d cruise down Whittier Boulevard with the music on in the car and we would be harassed by the sheriffs. And in the schools the students were mistreated and the classes were overcrowded. Continue reading