Hey Denver, join us next week for a radical series of events!

We’re inviting everyone to join Denver ABC and friends for three very special events on Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday of next week. Please spread the word and bring your neighbors, friends, and families. We’ll see you there!

Monday April 27th,
Black Flags and Windmills

https://www.facebook.com/events/1576721502591867/
NOTE EXACT LOCATION: Science Building Room 1067 University of Colorado Auraria Campus 80204
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This visual and engaging presentation will show what ordinary people can do to change their own worlds and create power from below without coercion. How the ideas of anarchism have shaped and influenced modern political movements from the post-Seattle alternative globalization movements to the Common Ground Collective after Hurricane Katrina, the Occupy uprisings and beyond. It will also cover the rise of the surveillance state and the implications of activism being labeled ā€˜terrorismā€™ .The presentation which is equal parts personal story, radical history and organizing philosophies asks questions about how we engage in social change, the real and perceived challenges presented by the state and power and dares us to rethink how we engage in creating our futures.

Organized by CU Denver’s Social Justice Minor with co-sponsorship from Auraria Climate Justice Coalition

scott crow is an international speaker and author. He has spent his varied life as a coop business owner, political organizer and educator, strategist, and underground musician who is a proponent of the philosophy and practices of anarchism.
He is the author of the acclaimed book Black Flags and Windmills: Hope, Anarchy and the Common Ground Collective (PM Press). Heā€™s a contributor to the books Grabbing Back: Essays Against the Global Land Grab (AK Press), The Black Bloc Papers (LBC), Witness to Betrayal (AK Press /Emergency Hearts) and What Lies Beneath: Katrina, Race and the State of the Nation(South End Press) as well as within radical and alternative publications He appears frequently in international media including the New York Times, Democracy Now, CNN, NPR, RT News, Mother Jones, Rolling Stone, Der Spiegel and Vice as well as in the political documentaries and Informant (Music Box), Better this World (PBS)and Welcome to New Orleans (Fridthjof Films). . He was under surveillance by the FBI as an alleged domestic terrorist threat for a decade without charges being brought. The New York Times characterized him as ā€œanarchist, veteran organizer and an aficionado of civil disobedienceā€, the FBI noted in a memo ā€œ…crow is a puppet master involved in direct action. ā€œ and NPRā€™s This American Life called him ā€œa living legend among anarchistsā€. He can be found at www.scottcrow.org

Tuesday April 28th,
Political Prisoners and the Perpetual Amerikan Conquest

https://www.facebook.com/events/820648224692843/
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From three former revolutionaries, an illuminating analysis of the current Amerikan police state, and how to fight it. Three former political prisoners and longtime activists, Ashanti Alston, Sekou Kambui, and Ricardo Romero, will share their perspectives on the ongoing repression in the U.S. in relation to political prisoner support and mass incarceration, and will take a look towards the future, at what is needed in the fight for a free society.

What has been done to free Amerikan political prisoners in the past that can be repeated? How can those tactics be adapted and added to in the fight against mass incarceration? What are the psychological, emotional, and spiritual demands on a revolutionary? How can we, in short, work to free our political prisoners first and foremost, and realize the revolutionary potential in ourselves and our communities? Three experienced activists and former prisoners speak out.

Organized by Denver ABC and Auraria Climate Justice Coalition.
Endorsed by Denver Community Defense Committee.

Wednesday April 29th,
Anarchist Movie Night: Historic Denver Protest Footage

https://www.facebook.com/events/1577277932555801/
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Wednesday 4/29, at 8pm we will be showing footage from Denver actions of the past:

-1992 MLK protests against against the Klan
-Riots following the murder of Marvin Booker
-2006 Columbus Day protests
-2011 O22 March Against Police Brutality
-Various footage from current day Denver actions

Hosted by Denver ABC at the Mutiny Information Cafe on Broadway and Ellsworth(2 S. Broadway).

Mayday!

From Libcom.org:

The history of the world holiday on the 1st May – Mayday, held in commemoration of four anarchists executed for struggling for an 8-hour day.

Originally a pagan holiday, the roots of the modern May Day bank holiday are in the fight for the eight-hour working day in Chicago in 1886, and the subsequent execution of innocent anarchist workers.

In 1887, four Chicago anarchists were executed; a fifth cheated the hangman by killing himself in prison. Three more were to spend 6 years in prison until pardoned by Governor Altgeld who said the trial that convicted them was characterised by “hysteria, packed juries and a biased judge”. The state had, in the words of the prosecution put “Anarchy is on trial” and hoped their deaths would also be the death of the anarchist idea.

The anarchists were trade union organisers and May Day became an international workers day to remember their sacrifice. They were framed on false charges of throwing a bomb at police breaking up a demonstration in Chicago. This was part of a strike demanding an 8 hour day involving 400,000 workers in Chicago that started May 1st 1886 .

It began over a century ago when the American Federation of Labour adopted an historic resolution which asserted that “eight hours shall constitute a legal day’s labour from and after May 1st, 1886”.

In the months prior to this date workers in their thousands were drawn into the struggle for the shorter day. Skilled and unskilled, black and white, men and women, “native” and immigrant were all becoming involved.
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November 11th: Remembering the Haymarket Martyrs

Haymarket MartyrsFrom IWW.org:

by X341968

In the city of Chicago on the evening of May 4th 1886, a protest meeting was held in the Haymarket Square. The meeting was organized by the anarchist community to protest the murder and wounding of several workers by the Chicago police the day before. The murdered men had been protesting outside the Mc Cormick Reaper Factory, from which they had been locked out by the owners. As some scabs were leaving the factory a confrontation occurred involving fighting and rock throwing. The police attacked the locked out workers first with clubs and then with revolvers. August Spies a militant anarchist labor agitator witnessed the shootings, became infuriated and wrote up a circular calling for “Workingmen to Arms.” A compositor unknown to Spies added the word, “Revenge!” so the circular read, “Revenge! Workingmen to Arms!!!” The evening of May 3rd at Greif’s saloon on West Lake Street, at a gathering of German anarchists, it was decided to hold the protest in the Haymarket Square the following evening at 7:30 pm.

The meeting was not well attended, the sponsors had hoped for a crowd of 20,000 and only 4,000 at best had showed up. The meeting got started late and was attended by none other than Chicago’s mayor Harrison. After listening to most of the speakers the mayor informed his police captain Bonefield he could dismiss most of his forces. Bonefield insisted on keeping his main force of men assembled at the police station only a block away for fear the meeting was only a diversion for some other violent activity. By ten o’clock a storm was blowing in and the crowd was down to only a few hundred listeners as Samuel Fielden was finishing up his speech. Having been informed by one of the many undercover officers in the crowd that Fielden had urged the crowd to “throttle the law,” captain Bonefield marched his police force into the crowd and demanded they disperse. Fielden pleaded “but we are peaceful” and anyway he was just finishing up, he started to climb down from the wagon that was being used as a stage for the speakers. Just then someone (nobody knows to this day who) threw a bomb into the ranks of the police. What ensued was a police riot in which many civilians and several police were shot dead and wounded.

As a result of the bombing eight anarchists, Albert Parsons, August Spies, Samuel Fielden, Michael Schwab, Oscar Neebe, George Engel, Adolph Fischer and Louis Lingg, were arrested, tried and convicted of murder…

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