Born A Suspect: Racist Hospital Threatens Mother and New Born Baby.

From Ida B. Wells Coalition Against Racism and Police Brutality:

Written by JoNina Abron-Ervin and edited by Brianna Burton, members of the Ida B. Wells Coalition Against Racism & Police Brutality

It is always said that babies,regardless of race, are born innocent, and should not have any racist legal or political standards applied to them. But this is not the case with black children and those of interracial couples. They are treated as criminals by the state and its police.

Your help is urgently needed to protest the use of armed security guards who threatened Kelly Stone, a new mother, at the Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center in Chicago, Ill. The baby’s father LeMar DeBooth, is a personal friend of mine and a comrade in the Black Autonomy Federation. Below is a complaint letter that we are asking everyone to email. Please feel free to reword the letter according to your own writing style. It should be sent to:

To: rose.cosme@advocatehealth.org

robert.zadylak@advocatehealth.org

donna.king@advocatehealth.org

cc: complaint@jointcommission.org

Also, on Monday, you may call the medical center’s patient relations representative, Rose Cosme, at (773)296-8217.

*************************************

To Whom It May Concern:

It has come to my attention that on July 11, armed guards at the Advocate Illinois Masonic Medical Center threatened Kelly Stone, who at the time was a patient at the medical center.

According to my information, these are the events leading up to this incident:

On July 8, Ms Stone gave birth to a male infant at the medical center. The baby was delivered by Cesarean section. After his birth, Ms. Stone and the father of the baby, Bondi LeMar DeBooth, verbally told nurses that they wanted to set up a breast feeding schedule for their son. Ms. Stone and Mr. DeBooth subsequently saw a nurse feeding formula milk to their son off the schedule. When they voiced their objections to the disruption of the feeding schedule, they said a medical center employee threatened to place their son in protective custody. Thereafter, Ms. Stone and Mr. DeBooth were were no longer allowed to be alone with their son, according to Mr. DeBooth. They were “chaperoned” at all times by medical center staff and made to feel like criminals.

On July 10, Ms. Stone and Mr. DeBooth filed a complaint with Rose Cosme, the medical center’s patient relations representative. The complaint charged the medical center with economic and racial discrimination. Ms. Stone, who is white, and Mr. DeBooth, who is black, are poor people.

Ms. Stone and Mr. DeBooth were told that their baby’s blood sugar was low. The baby was then moved to an infirmary so he could be treated. Later, while holding his son, Mr. DeBooth saw a scratch on his baby that he had not previously noticed. He asked a nurse about the cause of the scratch. The nurse said that the baby could not have scratched himself. Fearing that their son had been injured by someone on the medical center’s staff, Ms. Stone and Mr. DeBooth decided to file a new complaint with the patient relations representative on July 11.

While trying to leave the room in which Ms. Stone was recuperating from the surgical wounds of her C-Section, armed security guards stopped them. Afraid that Ms. Stone might be shot and killed, Mr. DeBooth stepped between her and the guards in order to protect her. When they asked why they could not leave the room to file their complaint, Ms. Stone and Mr. DeBooth were told by the security guards that they were not allowed to give the reason.

A social worker told Ms. Stone and Mr. DeBooth that in order for their son to be released to their care, the social worker would first have to inspect their home. This inspection could not occur until July 14 at the earliest, meaning that the baby would have to stay at the medical center at least until this date.

Under federal law, women who have C-sections are entitled to remain hospitalized for 96 hours, which would have allowed Ms. Stone to remain a patient until July 12. A patient can ask for earlier release by signing a form, which states that the patient understands that she is asking to be released before the recommended time. On July 11, Ms. Stone signed a form asking to be released from the medical center. She did so after a member of the medical center told her that by signing the form, she and Mr. DeBooth would be given a room, equipped with beds, in which they could stay with their baby over the weekend while waiting for the social worker’s inspection of their home. However, the room given to them did not have any beds. Did the medical center staff member deliberately lie to Ms. Stone?

Under the federal Patient Bill of Rights, a patient’s request for early release is not valid if the patient signed the request under duress. Based on what I have learned, I believe that Ms. Stone signed the request for release under extreme duress. This is illegal and unethical, and voids any “release form” by the hospital.

I believe that the medical center has committed major violations of Ms. Stone’s patient rights and the rights of Mr. DeBooth, the father of their son. If they were both white and middle class, I do not believe they would been mistreated. This was administrative racism. I am asking the medical center to conduct a complete investigation of this matter, and am sending a copy of this letter to the regulatory body for medical institutions, The Joint Commission and the federal Department of Health and Human Services.

Sincerely,

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BREAKING: 2 Animal Activists Indicted as Terrorists for Freeing Mink

From Green is the New Red:

tyler-lang-aetaTwo animal rights activists have been indicted on federal terrorism charges for allegedly releasing 2,000 mink and foxes from fur farms in the Midwest.

Tyler Lang and Kevin Olliff were charged with two counts of violating the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act and committing “animal enterprise terrorism.”

Olliff is currently in jail in Illinois, where he was sentenced to 30 months in jail for having boltcutters in his Prius.

Lang was arrested outside of a Veggie Grill restaurant in Los Angeles on Thursday. He had arrived to prepare for a fundraiser at the restaurant to benefit the Bunny Alliance, an animal rights group with which he volunteers.

When he saw FBI agents walking up to the restaurant, he said he knew something was wrong. He was on the phone with a friend, who joked that they were there to spy on the animal rights fundraiser. Before he was arrested, he told his friend “call my lawyer.”

At Lang’s bail hearing at a Los Angeles federal courthouse, the government asked for a $30,000 bond, which is $20,000 above what pre-trial services had recommended.

The prosecutor did not request that Lang be jailed awaiting trial, but said Lang was a flight risk because of his “extreme activism.”

“He has plans to travel the country for what he calls non-profit work,” the prosecutor said, “but what the government calls violent civil disobedience.”

Lang told me he had planned on beginning a tour this weekend with other volunteers, protesting airlines that transport primate for animal experimentation.

Lang may not be able to attend the protests, but other volunteers say they are undeterred.

“We know that Tyler would want us to carry on with the Fight or Flight tour,” said Amanda Schemkes, a Bunny Alliance volunteer. “It’s to further the campaign against the transport of animals to labs, as well as to build and empower grassroots activism in the face of state repression. Our work to help animals continues to be motivated by them rather than stifled by attempts to chill activism.”

The indictments come as hundreds of animal rights activists are in Los Angeles this weekend for the National Animal Rights Conference, where a prominent theme is corporate efforts to label non-violent protest activity as “terrorism.”

Releasing animals from fur farms is clearly against the law, but in the history of underground groups like the Animal Liberation Front not a single human being has been harmed; yet the FBI continues to label animal rights activism as “terrorism.”

New ag-gag laws go even further, criminalizating whistleblowers, undercover investigators and journalists who expose animal cruelty on factory farms.

As FBI agents and prosecutors prepared for Lang’s bail hearing, it was clear that even they were a bit confused about this “terrorism” case.

Outside of the courtroom, one FBI agent was overheard on a cell phone saying: “No, he is being charged with damaging property. Not damaging animals—they are against that.”